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The Pandemic Sciences Institute (PSI) has joined forces with the Science for Africa Foundation and the Mastercard Foundation to launch a call for applications to establish innovative networks of research excellence in epidemic and pandemic sciences across Africa.

Two male scientists working in a laboratory

The Pandemic Sciences Institute (PSI) at the University of Oxford, the Science for Africa Foundation, and the Mastercard Foundation have released a call for applications to establish networks of epidemic and pandemic sciences research excellence across Africa.      

The Epidemic Science Leadership and Innovation Networks (EPSILONs) aim to nurture and promote world-class epidemic and pandemic sciences research and innovation in Africa.  

The networks will be led by an outstanding African investigator based at an African research institution and will bring together multiple organisations in a consortium for up to six years. Each consortium will be awarded core funding of up to USD $4 million.  

The networks also aim to support a critical mass of experts in all health sectors across the continent to address ongoing health challenges while strengthening capabilities to respond to future and emerging infectious disease threats and support dignified and sustainable science careers across Africa.   

Read  the full story on the Pandemic Sciences Institute website

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