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Sir Stewart Cole, KCMG, FRS has joined the Ineos Oxford Institute for antimicrobial research (IOI) as Executive Chair. The IOI is a world-leading centre of research, training, and education in the field of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) based at the University of Oxford. It was established thanks to an unprecedented £100 million gift from INEOS, one of the world’s largest chemical companies.

Hands with gloves working with test tubes and some samples © Getty Images.

As Executive Chair, Professor Cole will provide strategic oversight to the Institute’s research and engagement activities, as the IOI strives to tackle one of the world’s biggest health challenges. In 2019, AMR – when bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites evolve to become resistant to medicines – is thought to have been directly responsible for 1.27 million global deaths and to have contributed to 4.95 million deaths.

Professor Cole is an internationally renowned scientist. He served as President of the Institut Pasteur in Paris from January 2018 to December 2023. Most recently he received the prestigious rank of Officier de la Légion d’honneur in France’s New Year honours.

In his role as Executive Chair, Professor Cole will work closely with the Institute’s senior leadership team and governing board to broaden engagement with other research organisations, the business sector, and policymakers.

 

Read the full story on the University of Oxford website.

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